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I had lunch this week with some pretty fun people I used to work with. In fact, this whole week has been great for getting out of the house and seeing friends. And getting out of the house has allowed me to observe more things—which is what this blog is supposed to be about.

So other than noticing that a whole lot of my neighbors are home during the day, I’ve noticed that one of the main topics of conversation everywhere seems to be about cutting costs.  On that note, let’s talk about a word we all love so much—FREE. In the old days people thought they liked free stuff. In the old days free stuff was really crap. It meant not valuable. (Because here in American we rate the value of things by how much they cost.)

It’s a new day folks. Free takes on a new meaning. It’s a necessity. And after ringing the office budget so much that even the Splenda gets cut, it’s time to realize how much fun free can be. It’s also good business. Using social media—the free networking sites—for marketing has become a hot new trend. (But that’s part of my professional expertise and you’re going to have to pay me to learn my secrets.) 

The truth is, there can be value in free. And as cliché as it is, we know deep down that the best things in life are free. Here’s a list—some very important and some just for fun.

  • Love.
  • Salvation.
  • Laughter. (Always share a good joke with your friends.)
  • A walk in the park.
  • For DC metro residents and visitors, the National Mall and the Smithsonian museums. (Hey, there’s a new Ben Stiller museum movie coming out that looks funny. But that costs money, sorry.)
  • Today a laptop. Tomorrow—not sure. Visit the free deal of the day to find out.
  • Air.
  • Network TV.
  • Swimming in the ocean and playing in the sand.
  • Great books in the library.
  • Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Word press.

 What do you like to do that’s free?

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