I wrote another post with that title a few years ago but it was appropriate again so I reused it. I used to sing the “I’m going lion hunting” song at camp and it was in my head over and over again as we drove through the Serengeti.

The Serengeti Park is an animal-lover’s paradise; just don’t drive over 60 kph or the ranger speed trap will get you. Our driver assured Mr. Ranger that he couldn’t possibly go that fast on this bumpy highway (I called him on that after we left the police stop, and seeing him zip right past 60 in a hot minute). But back to the game drive—which turned out to be one WOW experience after another.

We set out before dawn to see the animals in action. As we drove through some burnt fields (they burn the fields to keep the grass fresh), the sun began to rise. In Africa, so close to the equator, the sun rises in an instant. It was wonderful to see the orange and pink colors in the horizon and the big ball pop up, poof! A few minutes later we came upon a jackal having breakfast. Now for the most part we can expect and accept the fact that there are carnivores out there and they have to eat. However, the jackal doesn’t make clean kills like the lions do. Nope, we witnessed a brutal, long, repetitive attack. So, moving on…

More eating, but this time we came after the kill. We still got to see part of the zebra floating in the creek, and the crocodile who dined on him was so big in the midsection, he had to sit tight on the bank and hang out while his meal digested a bit. Evidently they stay that way for days and only need to eat big meals like that every six months give or take. That doesn’t mean they won’t kill in between, they just don’t need to.

As we moved slowly along the areas of tall grass, our traveling companion spotted a tail in the distance. Yup, a lion was headed this way. And then a minute later, without warning, her buddy who had been scouting out ahead of the pride made a move that sent a leopard scurrying up the tree right in front of us! Leopard sightings are rare so this was a treat. But hold on folks, it just gets better. Dad spotted another leopard climbing another tree in the distance! Our sweet girl’s hubby was sitting on top of an acacia tree keeping an eye on the pride below. Our girl up front near us slowly climbed higher and higher. Knowing she was capable, I still prayed out loud for her not to fall. These leopards were beautiful and we had the rare privilege of seeing two being chased by a pride of lions. Holy cats, batman! Even our driver guides were excited. After awhile, the lions gave up and left and then we moved on to the next encounter.

Througout the morning we were treated to sightings of a group of giraffe crossing the road, some more hippos (love them hippos), gazelles, waterbucks, topi, more wildebeest, elephants, baboons, zebras, and a group of young male lions. All of those sightings were spectacular—even the colorful birds in the trees and the foliage along the water.

Our final big sighting was a male lion who was resting comfortably (or so he seemed) under the shade of a tree that was located right at a crossroads, which of course attracted lots of jeeps and tourists. I was surprised to see him so close to a hippo pool since we were told they like to avoid the big swimmers. We got to see him up close and his face looked like Rocky Balboas after the Russian kicked his butt. He didn’t seem to mind and I thought he was still very beautiful.

On our way back to the hotel, we drove through a tsetse infected area and were besieged for about 10 minutes. That was the one and only time on the entire trip that we encountered the flies. In fact, after all the hubaloo about insect repellant and nets, covering, and medicine, the reality was that we were just not in areas (except this one) that had any real issues. It could have been the time of the year and also they don’t travel up to the high altitudes where we spent some of our time. In any case, I took my malaria pills faithfully just in case.

In the morning we drove over to the airstrip to take off for Arusha. But before we got there we had a little stop to look at a pair of male lions eating breakfast. It looked like a nice big animal—I got a few shots of one of the lions making off with a leg. Off in the distance with mouths watering were about 14 hyenas. I’m not sure how long the lions got to eat before the hyenas made their move—we didn’t have time to witness that.

Our plane took us over the Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti plains. In the distance the weather cleared (very unusual) for a beautiful view of the top of Mount Kilimanjaro. We arrived in another airstrip in Arusha. These airstrips are really fun—no security, no set schedule, dirt runways—all in all a nice way to travel except for the tiny planes. Off we went to the Cultural Heritage Center to eat lunch and shop. I wish we had more time to explore the artwork and talk to the artists there. But we did manage to shop and instead of the super expensive Tanzanite I wanted to buy, I took home a kitchen magnet and some photos of cool sculptures.

From Arusha we drove over the border and into Kenya. Once again I was photographed and fingerprinted both exiting Tanzania and entering Kenya. They love me, I’m telling you. Through the dirt roads of Kenya we made our way to Amboselli Park and more adventures! Until I can entertain you with the tales of Kenya, rent the movie Out of Africa—I watched it last night for the first time and loved it!

“I had a farm in Africa.” –Out of Africa

Other African Safari posts:

The breakfast of champions.

The breakfast of champions.

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Sunrise on the serengeti

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Mount Kilimanjaro

Cultural Heritage Center. "The big game."

Cultural Heritage Center. “The big game.”

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The hyenas wait there turn (or for enough of them to attack) at a chance at the lion's breakfast.

The hyenas wait their turn (or for enough of them to attack) at a chance at the lion’s breakfast.

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Mr. leopard high atop an acacia.

Mr. leopard high atop an acacia.

Looking for a way out...?

Looking for a way out…?

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Jackal has some breakfast--a poor gazelle.

Jackal has some breakfast–a poor gazelle.

This girl chased the leopard up the tree.

This girl chased the leopard up the tree.

The pride who want the leopard for lunch.

The pride who want the leopard for lunch.

Fat croc digesting a zebra.

Fat croc digesting a zebra.

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Masai giraffe (and their bird friends). A group of them (maybe 6-8) were hanging out near the watering hole and crossed our path.

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