Our next stop was for three wonderful nights at the famous Mt. Kenya Safari Club. Back in the 50’s, actor William Holden bought the club and invited his fancy, shmancy actor friends to join and hang out on the equator with him.

The Safari Club has a brick path down the center of the hotel in a courtyard to mark the equatorial line. When we arrived we were treated to a fun “crossing the line” ceremony where we danced down a carpet with two locals who were dressed in some pretty native costumes while some guy banged on a drum. I have my certificate and an embarrassing movie to keep for all times. After the ceremony, one of the staff members showed us a neat trick with water. First, in the northern hemisphere he poured water in a bowl and we watched how it moved in a clockwise direction down the bowl as it drained. We then walked about 50 yards over to the southern hemisphere and did the same thing—only the water went in a counterclockwise direction. So  I guess the old tale about the toilet water is true! It really was pretty amazing that this phenomenon could be seen in the space of just 50 yards.

After the demonstration we headed over to the animal orphanage on the premises. Mom and I and a few others from our group got to feed some of the animals that were very friendly and just walking around the area. It wasn’t like a zoo—these animals were being treated and cared for and then the plan is to release them back to the wild—at least some of them. Right off the bat, a little duiker (little antelope type animal) walked up to mom looking for some lovin’. Later I realized they were smart enough to know that the humans feed them, so they come looking for the corn pieces. Some funny looking monkeys that I dubbed skunk monkeys for their black bodies and white striped backs, but were in fact called Colobus monkeys, climbed up on my shoulder, then sat on my head and reached to the other hand to grab the food. It was fun—we had a few laughs at their antics.

We also got to see a 150 year old turtle, who evidently was just a teenager. He was massive—mom got to sit on him and take a little ride. I passed for the sake of the turtle. We were told he had a girlfriend who was nearby (and later heard evidence of their courtship). There were several Caracal (I thought they were Lynx) that did not seem to like our guide—they gave him a hiss and the stink eye when he got too close. But others were friendly—like the crowned cranes, the porcupine, the warthog and pig, and some patas monkeys who were in enclosures. The cheetahs ignored us—acting just like cats do and we got to pet an ostrich as well. One new animal for us that we got to feed was the Bongo (another antelope with chestnut coloring and interesting white stripes) who we were told was a very sought after animal years ago. Every zoo wanted one. They are hard to find and very secretive.

Even the plants here were interesting. One was called a bottle brush and it looks rough but was very soft and a vibrant red color. Roses and other varieties of flowers dotted the landscape throughout the grounds.

Finally we saw some little cats. They called them African wild cats but I swear it looked exactly like my tabby May and in fact I looked it up and they sometimes wander into towns and mate with house cats. Hmmm.

Back at the hotel we relaxed in the pool and gazed at Mt. Kenya off in the distance and then dodged some pretty sizable and scary looking marabou storks back to the beautiful rooms with fireplaces. The staff at this hotel must have been bored and in need of something to do because the service was so exceptional and there were so many of them I swear I felt like they were about to actually spoon feed me at one point.

The next day mom, dad and I walked the hotel’s mascot dogs, Tusker and Grammy, around the grounds (they belong to someone but guests can walk them). We took to them immediately seeing as how they were black labs—our kind of dogs. They had a lot of energy—it was hard to say who was walking who, but cute as buttons.

After the dog walk I of course headed to my happy place—the pool. While ordering some cocktails at the bar, the men working there seemed interested if I was going to swim again and hang out today. I thought that was a bit strange until later when I discovered (through the hostess in the restaurant) that “African men like big women.” Ohhhh, that explains it. Creepy, but okay. In any case, they can’t make a Pina Colada for ca-ca, so don’t bother ordering one. But they did serve it with a smile—what a great place to stay!

The equatorial line at the Mount Kenya Safari Club.

The equatorial line at the Mount Kenya Safari Club.

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bottle brush flower

bottle brush flower

Bongo

Bongo

crowned crane

crowned crane

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caracal--he's grumpy.

caracal–he’s grumpy.

mom rides a 150 year old turtle.

mom rides a 150 year old turtle.

the colobus monkey or my new hair style?

the colobus monkey or my new hair style?

mom and dad at the crossing the equator ceremony.

mom and dad at the crossing the equator ceremony.

water flows in one direction or another depending on what hemisphere you're in.

water flows in one direction or another depending on what hemisphere you’re in.

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marabou stork. Scary looking guys who hung around the hotel grounds.

marabou stork. Scary looking guys who hung around the hotel grounds.

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